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New Study Warns of Changing Climate’s Impact on Midwest Infrastructure

Roads, Bridges, Railways, and Energy Systems Face Potentially Costly Consequences


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  October 10, 2017

CONTACT:  Todd Stenhouse, 916-397-1131


Chicago:  As intense weather events batter U.S. coastal cities and offshore islands, a new study from the Midwest Economic Policy Institute warns that the threat of climate change extends much farther inland, with potentially devastating impacts on transportation and infrastructure systems across the Midwest.

Read the Study: Climate Change and its Impact on Infrastructure Systems in the Midwest

Report Summary: Click Here to Read the Summary

“Whether we like it or not, the climate of the Midwest is already changing,” said study author Mary Craighead.  “It is vital for policymakers to understand the potential costs and consequences of these changes, and to be proactive in taking actions that are necessary to protect communities and the infrastructure on which our entire regional economy depends.”
Continue reading “New Study Warns of Changing Climate’s Impact on Midwest Infrastructure”

Construction Fatalities Cost the United States $5 Billion Per Year

The construction industry is one of the most dangerous industries in the United States. Construction workers face a wide range of hazards when they arrive on the job site each workday, including large equipment, heavy supplies, height hazards, and long hours. It is important that construction workers are well trained and highly skilled in order to limit on-the-job injuries and fatalities.

NEW REPORT: The $5 Billion Cost of Construction Fatalities in the United States: A 50 State Comparison

Over the past four decades, OSHA and its state partners have worked with labor unions, employers, and safety and health advocates to increase workplace safety. Many employers and contractors put their workers through training and safety programs to ensure workers are prepared for job sites. Safety and health programs encourage a proactive approach to finding and fixing job site hazards before they cause injury or illness. Today, workers are less likely to die on-the-job than they were 40 years ago due to workplace safety efforts.

However, there is still room for improvement. A new report by the Midwest Economic Policy Institute (MEPI) finds that a total of 4,339 construction workers lost their lives at work from 2011 through 2015. This means that an average of 867.8 construction workers suffered a workplace fatality per year, or about 16 construction workers every week across the nation. Continue reading “Construction Fatalities Cost the United States $5 Billion Per Year”

What Are Road Construction Costs Per Lane Mile in Your State?

States play a significant role in the construction and maintenance of the country’s roadway system. Each state employs its own approach and objectives when planning and constructing highway infrastructure, including addressing obstacles and environments unique to that state.  A recent report by the Midwest Economic Policy Institute explores the highway construction costs for each state and more closely examines them throughout the Midwest.

Full Report:  A Comparison of Highway Construction Costs in the Midwest and Nationally

The figure below summarizes each state’s highway construction, right-of-way (ROW) acquisition, and engineering costs per lane mile.  This analysis provides an illustration of how construction costs compare between states; however, as stated above, each state encounters its own unique complications that factor into overall costs.  Therefore, it cannot be exclusively used as a definition of cost effectiveness.  Continue reading “What Are Road Construction Costs Per Lane Mile in Your State?”

“Right-to-Work” Laws in the Midwest Have Reduced Unionization and Lowered Wages

Taken from Illinois Update and the Illinois Economic Policy Institute (ILEPI).


A new study finds that the introduction of “right-to-work” laws has reduced the unionization rate by 2.1 percentage points and lowered worker wages by 2.6% in Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin. Continue reading ““Right-to-Work” Laws in the Midwest Have Reduced Unionization and Lowered Wages”

HB 1002: Investing in Indiana’s Future

Indiana is well-positioned to improve its transportation infrastructure. Providing further investment in the network would support business growth and a thriving economy.   Continue reading “HB 1002: Investing in Indiana’s Future”

How the Decline of Unions Has Caused Inequality to Rise in Each Midwest State

A new report finds that union decline has resulted in economic redistribution from workers to owners.

Continue reading “How the Decline of Unions Has Caused Inequality to Rise in Each Midwest State”

Gas Taxes are Unsustainable for Transportation Infrastructure Needs

Transportation infrastructure is essential for economic growth.  In order to maintain quality transportation infrastructure, sustainable funding is imperative.  An Economic Commentary [PDF] by the Midwest Economic Policy Institute explores the role of the motor fuel tax both nationally and internationally.  The United States currently suffers from insufficient funding due to a broken system. Without changes, more and more roads, bridges, and public transit systems will fall into disrepair.

The primary source of transportation funding in the United States is the motor fuel tax – also known as the gas tax or fuel tax.  The federal gasoline and diesel taxes currently stand at 18.4 cents and 24.4-cents per gallon, respectively.

The revenue collected from federal fuel taxes is deposited into the Highway Trust Fund (HTF).  While fuel taxes previously served as the primary source of funding for the HTF, comprising over 80 percent of its funding between 1995 and 2007, they have proven to be an unsustainable revenue source in recent years.  Between 2008 and 2014, the HTF received $65 billion from the U.S. Treasury’s general fund to meet the fund’s obligations, since annual spending for highways and transit began to exceed the revenues generated. Continue reading “Gas Taxes are Unsustainable for Transportation Infrastructure Needs”

Some Opponents of Prevailing Wage Are Really Bad at Math

A new report by the Midwest Economic Policy Institute finds that prevailing wage repeal cannot result in “44 percent savings” in Wisconsin.


Full Report PDF: Prevailing Wage Repeal Cannot Result in “44 Percent Savings:” Evidence from Southwestern Wisconsin

Prevailing wage supports blue-collar workers employed on public construction projects. By preventing government from using its massive purchasing power to undercut local standards, prevailing wage laws ensure that workers are paid a competitive, up-to-date wage and benefits package determined by private actors. Continue reading “Some Opponents of Prevailing Wage Are Really Bad at Math”

Minimum-Wage Workers Cannot Afford One-Bedroom Apartments in the Midwest

A minimum-wage employee working full time cannot afford a modest one-bedroom apartment in Illinois, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Indiana, or Iowa. In all five Midwestern states, the minimum wage should be at least $10.00 an hour.

Continue reading “Minimum-Wage Workers Cannot Afford One-Bedroom Apartments in the Midwest”

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